CSB Research Day 2017

Seminars to be held in RW 117; Poster exhibition in RW 010

Special Presentation:  Prof. Leah E. Cowen, Dept. of Molecular Genetics

Refreshment & lunch provided.

Afternoon reception and awards ceremony in RW010 from 4:30-6:30

Registrants only please!

 

CSB Seminar: Prof. James Dowling, Staff Physician, Hospital for Sick Children, Senior Scientist, Genetics and Genome Biology, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto

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Departmental Seminar

Prof. James Dowling
Staff Physician, Hospital for Sick Children
Senior Scientist: Genetics and Genome Biology
Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto
On Sabbatical at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York

Swimming toward therapy: zebrafish and the quest for drug discovery in rare genetic diseases

Host:  Prof. Vince Tropepe  <v.tropepe@utoronto.ca>

Abstract:

There are over 7000 rare diseases, and they affect more than 1 million Canadians. Advances in genomics have led to an unprecedented understanding of the genetic basis of rare disease, though despite this nearly half of all patients with genetic disorders do not yet have an identified gene mutation. More importantly, there estimated to be less than 500 therapies for these 7000 diseases, with the vast majority of conditions without any meaningful treatments.  My research program has set out to tackle these barriers.  We have used the zebrafish model system as our main solution.  In this seminar, I will discuss our use of zebrafish for rare disease gene discovery and therapy identification.  I will present specific examples of our successes, and discuss where we have encountered challenges.  Most of our work has centered on understanding and treating human muscle diseases, though the discussion will be framed around how these studies are potentially broadly applicable to most/all rare diseases.

 

Video Conferencing at UTM (DV3138) & UTSc (MW229)

CSB Seminar: Prof. Will Wood, Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, on sabbatical at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York

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Departmental Seminar

Prof. Will Wood
Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow
School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Faculty of Biomedical Sciences,
University of Bristol
On Sabbatical at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York

“Detecting Death and Damage in vivo; Understanding Macrophage migration in Drosophila”

Host:  Prof. Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez  <rodrigo.fernandez.gonzalez@utoronto.ca>

 

Abstract:

A critical early wound response is the recruitment of inflammatory cells drawn by danger cues released by the damaged tissue. Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as the earliest wound attractant in Drosophila and Zebrafish and more recently we have shown using fly embryos that laser wounding triggers an instantaneous calcium flash in the epithelium which in turn activates the NADPH oxidase DUOX to generate Hydrogen Peroxide. As a consequence of hydrogen peroxide production, macrophages (hemocytes) within the fly embryo rapidly migrate toward the wound site powered by the formation of dynamic actin-rich lamellipodia. We are using live imaging to understand the mechanism by which inflammatory cells are able to detect hydrogen peroxide and generate the dynamic actin-rich structures necessary for their migration. We are particularly interested in how immune cells are able to integrate competing cues such as wound induced damage signals and ‘eat me’ cues from apoptotic corpses and how previous exposure to one cue is able to influence the cell’s ability to respond to subsequent signals.

 

Video Conferencing at UTM (DV3138) & UTSc (MW229)